Alliance Recovery Specialists

Suboxone Center in Alliance, Ohio

Suboxone is a combination of two generic medications, buprenorphine and naloxone.

The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000

In 2000, Congress authorized qualifying doctors to prescribe and dispense the opioid buprenorphine to treat opioid addiction. Most other opioids are highly regulated and may only be dispensed to patients if they are in a regimented clinic treatment program. Buprenorphine is the main active ingredient in Suboxone. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act’s long-term intention is to empower primary physicians to conduct Suboxone treatment and other drug addiction treatment procedures, rather than confining such measures to traditional methadone clinic settings that can be expensive and otherwise restrictive for some patients.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a combination of two generic medications, buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is an opioid used to treat opioid addiction. Its half-life is around 24-60 hours. It has an affinity for certain opioid receptors, so it sticks around in the body, blocking other opioids from occupying those receptors and having an effect.

Buprenorphine’s slow metabolism and high fat solubility also contribute to its long duration.

Naloxone, the secondary ingredient, is an opioid antagonist. It does nothing when taken sublingually, but if injected, it zeroes out the effects of opioids and can even cause instant withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone treatment is recommended for patients with heroin and other opiate addictions.

How Suboxone Differs From Methadone

Suboxone is a partial opiate agonist, which means it takes up the receptors in the brain that respond to opiates without giving the patient the full high that most opioids deliver. In addition, Suboxone is generally less addictive than methadone, and is unpleasant to abuse intravenously because of the second ingredient, naloxone.

Methadone, on the other hand, must be dispensed in a clinic for the first several days so that patients can’t save up and then take enough all at once to get high. Making patients travel to a clinic every day to continue their treatment means there is one more impediment to rehabilitation, one more reason for addicts to give up on their recovery.

In addition, Suboxone is generally less addictive than methadone, and is unpleasant to abuse intravenously because of the second ingredient, naloxone. This additive also means that the risk of fatal overdose is much lower than with methadone.

Taking Suboxone

A patient self-administering Suboxone treatment must let the film absorb sublingually, meaning under the tongue. Suboxone treatment can interact with other drugs that affect the central nervous system or cause drowsiness, such as muscle relaxants, painkillers, alcohol, antihistamines, and anti-anxiety medications.

Alliance Recovery Specialists provides Suboxone treatment to patients in the Alliance, Ohio, area, and our offices are convenient to surrounding Ravenna, Canton, and Salem. All visits are by appointment only. Call 330.536.7461 to set up a confidential appointment and start on the path to recovery.